….While We’re Busy Asking Favor For A Parking Place

Christian persecution in Sudan

She refuses to deny the name of the only Man

Who lit up her soul in a warped darkened land

Once her child is born she’s on borrowed time

100 lashes and a noose await for her crime

To her family she’ll die an apostate adulteress disgrace

While we’re busy asking Him favor for a parking place

Bring Back our Girls Nigeria

All they ever wanted was to read and write

They’re victims caught up in demonic guerilla fight

It’s illegal to give an education to chattel

So these girls are leverage in the midst of battle

They’ll be kidnapped, raped, and sold without a trace

While we’re busy asking favor for a parking place

While we're busy asking favor for a parking place

And while we dream-speak, blab-grab, and name-claim

Grip old laws to hoard coats and boats and fleeting fame

We forget our bloody Savior who died without friend or home

The apostles and early church torn apart by lions in Rome

Our American god wants to quench our every desire and taste

So we’re busy asking favor for a parking place

Precious bride: The tragedy is not that we’ve lost the cultural war

Or that we’re socialistic or relativistic or materialistic at our core

It’s not that we fail in signs, service, or power

Or that church membership is falling by the hour

It’s that we’ve lost the beautiful simple gospel of His grace

While we’re busy asking favor for a parking place.

Bryan Daniels

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Getting blind drunk on 200 proof Grace…

“The Reformation was a time when men went blind, staggering drunk because they had discovered, in the dusty basement of late medievalism, a whole cellar full of 1500 year old, 200 proof Grace–bottle after bottle of pure distillate of Scripture, one sip of which would convince anyone that God saves us single-handedly. The word of the Gospel–after all those centuries of trying to lift yourself into heaven by worrying about the perfection of your bootstraps–suddenly turned out to be a flat announcement that the saved were home before they started.” Robert Capon

Turnt on Grace. Let’s start another Reformation of Grace guzzlers shall we?

 

Sleeping Beauty Can Be Ugly

 

The other morning Josiah received a Cyberverse Transformer from my garage-sale-hopping wife (I can neither confirm nor deny she’s addicted). I wouldn’t have recognized this character had his name not been on the unopened box: “MudFlap.” When he’s not a Decepticon-fighting Autobot he’s drag racing the streets as an orange tricked out Chevy Traxx. So he’s a good guy.

But when we lifted his head out of the hood my six year old had a couple of questions:

Mudflap got beat by the ugly tree.
Mudflap got beat by the ugly tree.

“Why is Mudflap ugly? Is he bad?”

I stumbled over an answer and tried to explain how good guys can be ugly too. As parents, we have attempted to sow into our sons the truth that looks have nothing to do with a person’s character. But the dominating wind of culture seemed to blow all those seeds away for a moment.

It got me thinking.

My first crush was probably Ariel, from Disney’s “The Little Mermaid.” I was seven. Other than fish scales for legs, she was a knockout redhead with a Barbie body and a voice like a choir of baby angels. A mythical creature.*

Ariel, The Little Mermad

She was good.

And Beautiful.

But this disgusting obese Octo witch wasn’t:

Ursula the Seawitch, Little Mermaid
Bad and Ugly

Sleeping Beauty didn’t have an overbite. Prince Charming didn’t have a double chin.

They’re good.

And beautiful.

Even when the culture tries to get it right, it still gets it wrong. “Beauty and The Beast” has good intentions from the outset, but the chivalrous premise disintegrates in the end. The “Beast” is actually a dude who looks like this:

I mean, come on.
I mean, come on.

You didn’t think a beautiful girl would live happily ever after with that ponytailed Giant Schnauzer did you?

It’s not just a Disney induced disease. “The Avengers” movie series has a similar premise, just for an older audience:

Other than the roid raging Hulk, the main characters consist of 1. A cocky billionaire playboy with a hot wife and genius wit (Iron Man) 2. A god King with a chiseled frame and flowing Fabio like blond hair (Thor) 3. The perfect boy next door and patriot who may be part timing as an Abercrombie and Fitch model (Captain America).

All good guys. All good-looking.

Even though we know this shouldn’t be true, we drink this Kool Aid down. It’s the toxic air we passively breathe, so we rarely notice it. Modern renditions of Christ confirm this. How many commercial caricatures of Jesus make him a tall white Vidal Sassoon spokesman with six-pack abs? A pure and holy pretty boy. A soft Savior:

Not Jesus

You want to know what Christ looked like on earth? Go to any Iraqi village and look into the sun worn face and dark brown eyes of the average male peasant there. You’ll be closer to truth.

But the truth isn’t sexy. And most times, neither is good.

The most evil creature in the world masquerades as a beautiful angel of light (2 Corinthians 11:14). So beauty, in all of its alluring draw, can be flat-out bad. It can be twisted for the worst.

Let’s reject the fallen outlook that only values what is seen.

The real knights in Shining Armor may have acne.

The real Princesses may be quite plain.

But they shine like stars (Philippians 2:15). Now and ever after.

Bryan Daniels

*I married my very own bombshell redhead 14 years later